Why New Year’s Resolutions Just Don’t Work

Why New Year’s Resolutions Just Don’t Work

How to make your yearly aims achievable (or why New Years Resolutions Just Don’t Work)

Did you make any New Year’s resolutions this year? If so, are you still on track, or have you already decided they were too hard to stick to?

What typically happens when we make a New Year’s Resolution is it gets stuck to for a couple of weeks and then forgotten about. Even if you are tracking your progress and manage to stick with it for a little longer, there are a few reasons why almost 90% of New Years Resolutions are broken within the first few weeks.

  1. Complete deprivation

Whether this is doughnuts or designer handbags, identifying something that is clearly a vice of yours and then deciding to go cold turkey is rarely going to be a success.

 

  1. Good intentions but no plan

It’s all very well to say “I want to pay off my credit card” but if you don’t come up with a budget or a timescale then good intentions can quickly become forgotten as we go back to old habits.

  1. Not tracking progress

Often people can give up when they become demotivated, feeling like they are not getting anywhere. By using a simple progress tracker it is easy to see results, no matter small, and how they build up quickly over time.

  1. No accountability

I can understand why people would not want to share their goals with the world, especially if they involve the very personal and often sensitive issues of debt and/or weight loss. However, I found I was much more focused in achieving my goals once I’d shared them in my monthly blog posts and on social media. Don’t get me wrong, they don’t go on my personal accounts where friends and family would see, but there is a whole community of likeminded people online that can help keep you motivated. If this appeals to you, you could consider setting up an “anonymous” account – there are many of these in the Instagram debt free community – where you can share your goals and get inspriation from others without sharing any personal info or pics. Alternatively, just be accountable to yourself and write them down in a notebook or on your phone.

You can follow me on Insta here 

  1. No short term success

If a goal can only be achieved over the course of a year then it can quickly become forgotten about, this is why I break my yearly aims into monthly goals so every month you can track your progress and adjust accordingly in order to achieve your aims by the end of the year.

I am going to use some of my own yearly aims as an example of how I will break them down into monthly goals.

Yearly aim – Start listening to podcasts

Monthly goal for January – Listen to 1 podcast per week

Yearly aim – Make £300+ per month in side hustles

Monthly goal – List 50 items on EBay

Yearly aim: Complete Baby Step 1 & 2

Monthly goals – Pay off my car (1 payment remaining)

Put £350 into emergency fund

You will notice there are nearly always numbers involved so I can track my progress. This is crucial in keeping me motivated and on track! You may have heard of SMART goals:

Specific – There’s no point in saying “lose weight” or “make money”, put a figure on how much this month.

Measurable – My tracker below will help with this.

Achievable – Make your goals too lofty and you’ll be flattened when you don’t get there. Start off small.

Realistic – ditto above.

Timescale – You are setting monthly goals so you will be able to review your progress every month. You could make this weekly or fortnightly if you wished.

 

How to measure progress

There is no set way to measure progress, but I have devised a tracker the can be customised to fit your own goals.

If you have subscribed to my free #Supercharge2019 course of which this is a part of, you will receive the tracker as part of the freebies bundle. If not, you can sign up here and get the whole course emailed to you as well as the exclusive freebies.

 

 

 

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