Is it worth selling CDs on eBay?

Is it worth selling CDs on eBay?

Is it worth selling CDs on eBay?

 

Anyone who has visited a charity shop, car boot or jumble sale in the past few years will know that CDs, once something many of us would happily pay £10 + for, can now barely fetch pennies and are often bundled together in deals such as 5 for £1.

Thanks to streaming and smart speakers, many of us are decluttering not just the music, but the stereo systems too meaning that without a CD player there is literally no point in owning stacks of discs taking up space.

Being in my teens in the 90s and a big music lover to boot, I have a substantial CD collection that I know has cost me probably several thousands of pounds over the years. I am now at the point where I am happy to upload my music to iTunes and get rid of the actual discs.

You may have considered donating, or perhaps getting a bit of money for yours from reselling companies such as Music Magpie. However, they will often only offer you actual pennies for albums (10p seems to be common) or worse still, actually refuse titles altogether! Currently, there is a clear low cost / low demand cycle at work.

However, there are definitely a few titles that buck this trend. Personally I have sold certain CDs on eBay for more than I paid for them, and in some cases much more. So before you surrender your music collection to the local charity shop, what should you be looking out for when selling CDs?

You can read more about my eBay selling adventures here

 

  1. Check the rarity

 

By this I don’t just mean a limited pressing or misprint that makes certain titles worth thousands like these – but there are plenty of CDs that can still fetch between £10 and £20 a piece. Often these can be titles that weren’t mainstream or popular at the time of release.

Between myself and my husband, we have several 90s hip hop and dance titles that are worth over £10 each. We both remember (loosely) that these were the titles that you might have had to order in from the record shop and certainly not ones that made the album chart.

This doesn’t mean that “collector’s editions” are automatically worth more either, especially if they sold well at the time. For example, I have Blur’s “13” album which came as a collector’s edition in a presentation box with collectible cards and a poster, but as it was number 1 in the album charts and was certified Platinum in sales, it’s pretty common and so currently selling for under £3.

 

  1. Is it a collectible artist?

Artists with a loyal fanbase and a hefty back catalogue of rarer titles can fetch more money. For example, Mariah Carey has a global fanbase and has been releasing music since the early 90s and is still a major artist today. her albums will have sold well at the time, but her CD singles would have had a more limited market.  New fans may be keen to get hold of discontinued singles and those not available on streaming services, which is where the value comes in. By contrast, most Mariah CD albums are not worth more than £1 or so as they are still widely available, but some (not all) of her cd singles can fetch between £5-£20+.

3. Sell similar titles as a bundle

You may have a few titles by the same artist worth £1-2 each and wonder if it’s worth the hassle of listing them, but bundling them together can make them more attractive to buyers and enable you to round up the price accordingly. Compilation albums such as Now, Ministry of Sound and Hed Kandi have all sold well in this way.

4. Look at comparable sales

 

Even disregarding the rarity, genre and artist can still bring up some surprisingly valuable finds, so the only way to know for sure is to check the value. Even if you aren’t interested in selling CDs, you can use the barcode scanner on the eBay app to directly scan your discs. This will then bring up any of the same titles up for sale.

This CD Price checker website also offers a similar service comparing the prices on a number of sites, although I have found it is not always as up to date as going directly through eBay.

Before your eyes pop out on stalks at some of the prices, be sure to filter by sold listings just to check what people are actually buying for. Just because someone has decided to list a CD for £40 doesn’t mean anyone is actually going to pay that! Similarly, ensure that the sold items you are comparing are pre-owned as new / sealed items tend to go for a higher price.

Could you be sitting on a small fortune?

To sum up, the best way to check if it’s worth your time selling CDs, is to check their current value. Sometimes there appears to be no obvious rhyme or reason why a title might be worth selling. There are so many millions of titles available that it would be impossible to create a list that would be helpful to everyone, but just as an example here are 5 titles I have personally found or sold for £10+:

Mansun – Kleptomania (2004) – £19.99

De La Soul – 3ft High and Rising (1995) – £10.50

Lords of the Underground. -Keepers of the Funk £9.99

DJ Tiesto – Magik 5 (1999) £12.50

Hed Kandi Bundles – various prices

Do you still have any CDs that might be worth selling? Let me know in the comments!


Write a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: